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No more will we run from the past or shovel it under the rug but we will take it head on. We must start the healing.

Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome will rock your world and stir up the emotion are you ready to deal with the truth?

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The time as come for us to give him back everything and except our own. What is our own? what is Our-Story? not His-Story Let Wu-Nuwaup remove the amnesia from your mind.

Pyramid Niger Central Africa In February 2012, Garba announced his discovery of a pyramid in the village of Dan Baki, 20 km west of the city of Zinder and 2 km north of the village of Tirmini. Garba estimates that the yet unopened pyramid contains more than 40,000 gold objects.

Pyramids Found At Dan Baki Niger.

The Dan Baki pyramid has a twin nearby and appears to be part of a series of pyramids located in the region of Tanout. All the pyramids in the neighborhood appear to have remained sealed.

Mr. Garba reports that this discovery is the “result of our activities we have been carrying out over 7 years and with a private institute of the United States of America.”

Garba explained that years of study of the hieroglyphic texts led him to the name of the village where he discovered the pyramid. He believes that the point of origin of humanity is in Niger. From there people spread into Chad, Nigeria, Sudan, Egypt, Yemen and Saudi Arabia. He has not attempted to explain the presence of more ancient monuments in Southern Africa, Turkey and China.

Study of the ancient hieroglyphic texts reveals a close affinity between Ancient Egyptian and Hausa. The names Tanout and Dar-Gaza constantly recur in the hieroglyphic texts that Garba studied. Dar-Gaza means “crown of God” and refers to the Sun. Gaza is a variant of Giza.

 

Were The Ancient Egyptians Really Black?

More and more people are asking this question as information swirls through cyber space. Everyone seems to have an opinion without gathering all the facts. There is no controversy only in the minds of those people grasping for straws or those refusing to accept what the growing evidence is saying regarding who the original ancient Egyptian were .

Ancient Egyptian race controversy

From Wikipedia.
This article is about the “history of the controversy” about the race of the ancient Egyptians. For discussion of the scientific evidence relating to the race of the ancient Egyptians, see Population history of Egypt.

The question of the race of ancient Egyptians was raised historically as a product of the scientific racism of the 18th and 19th centuries, and was linked to models of racial hierarchy. A variety of views circulated about the racial identity of the Egyptians and the source of their culture.[1] These were typically identified in terms of a distinction between the “Black African” and pale or “darkened Caucasian” (including Eurasian and Asiatic) racial categories. Some accounts argued that Egyptian culture emerged from more southerly African peoples, while others pointed to influences from the Near East (the Levant, Mesopotamia and Asia Minor), and yet others proposed that at least the upper classes were pale or “darkened” Caucasians.

Since the second half of the 20th century, scholarly consensus has held that applying modern notions of race to ancient Egypt is anachronistic. The 2001 Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt states that “Any characterization of race of the ancient Egyptians depends on modern cultural definitions, not on scientific study.”[2] Frank M. Snowden asserts that “Egyptians, Greeks and Romans attached no special stigma to the colour of the skin and developed no hierarchical notions of race whereby highest and lowest positions in the social pyramid were based on colour.”[3][4] Additionally, typological and hierarchical models of race have increasingly been rejected by scientists. Recent studies suggest that the modern population is genetically consistent with an ancient Egyptian indigenous to northeast Africa.

In the late 20th century, the typological model was revived in the domain of Afrocentric historiography and Black nationalism which suggests that Ancient Egypt was a “black civilization”[5] This includes a particular focus on links to southern African (Sub Saharan) cultures and the questioning of the race of specific notable individuals from Dynastic times, including Tutankhamun[6], Cleopatra VII,[7][8][9] and the king represented in the Great Sphinx of Giza.[10][11] This theory points to an alleged strong cultural and ethnic affinity of the southern ancient Egyptians with their southern neighbours, the Nubians, and claims that the ancient Egyptians were more like their African neighbours than their Asiatic and Southern-European neighbours in terms of their skin colour and features.

Pyramid Found In Niger Central Africa

 

 

Black Wall Street Black Holocaust The Untold Story

Searching under the heading of “riots,” “Oklahoma” and “Tulsa” in current editions of the World Book Encyclopedia, there is conspicuously no mention whatsoever of the Tulsa race riot of 1921, and this omission is by no means a surprise, or a rare case. The fact is, one would also be hard-pressed to find documentation of the incident, let alone and accurate accounting of it, in any other “scholarly” reference or American history book.

Black Wall Street The Black Holocaust The Untold Story!

Black Wallstreet was a prime example of the typical Black community in America that did businesses, but it was in an unusual location. You see, at the time, Oklahoma was set aside to be a Black and Indian state. There were over 28 Black townships there. One third of the people who traveled in the terrifying “Trail of Tears” along side the Indians between 1830 to 1842 were Black people.
The citizens of this proposed Indian and Black state chose a Black governor, a treasurer from Kansas named McDade. But the Ku Klux Klan said that if he assumed office that they would kill him within 48 hours. A lot of Blacks owned farmland, and many of them had gone into the oil business. The community was so tight and wealthy because they traded dollars hand-to-hand, and because they were dependent upon one another as a result of the Jim Crow laws.
It was not unusual that if a resident’s home accidentally burned down, it could be rebuilt within a few weeks by neighbors. This was the type of scenario that was going on day- to-day on Black Wallstreet. When Blacks intermarried into the Indian culture, some of them received their promised ’40 acres and a mule’ and with that came whatever oil was later found on the properties.

Black Wall Street The Black Holocaust The Untold Story!

Black Wall Street Part 5

Black Wall Street The Black Holocaust The Untold Story!

The best description of Black Wallstreet, or Little Africa as it was also known, would be liken it to a mini-Beverly Hills. It was the golden door of the Black community during the early 1900s, and it proved that African Americans had successful infrastructure. That’s what Black Wallstreet was all about.
The dollar circulated 36 to 100 times, sometimes taking a year for currency to leave the community. Now in 1995, a dollar leaves the Black community in 15-minutes. As far as resources, there were Ph.D.’s residing in Little Africa, Black attorneys and doctors. One doctor was Dr. Berry who owned the bus system. His average income was $500 a day, a hefty pocket change in 1910.
During that era, physicians owned medical schools. There were also pawn shops everywhere, brothels, jewelry stores, 21 churches, 21 restaurants and two movie theaters. It was a time when the entire state of Oklahoma had only two airports, yet six Blacks owned their own planes. It was a very fascinating community.

 

Black Wall Street Part 4

Black Wall Street The Black Holocaust The Untold Story!

The date was June 1, 1921, when “Black Wall Street,” the name fittingly given to one of the most affluent all-Black communities in America, was bombed from the air and burned to the ground by mobs of envious whites. In a period spanning fewer than 12 hours, a once thriving 36-Black business district in northern Tulsa lay smoldering–a model community destroyed, and a major African-American economic movement resoundingly defused.

The night’s carnage left some 3,000 African Americans dead, and over 600 successful businesses lost. Among these were 21 churches, 21 restaurants, 30 grocery stores and two movie theaters, plus a hospital, a bank, a post office, libraries, schools, law offices, a half dozen private airplanes and even a bus system. As could have been expected the impetus behind it all was the infamous Ku Klux Klan, working in consort with ranking city officials, and many other sympathizers.

In their self-published book, Black Wallstreet: A Lost Dream, and its companion video documentary, Black Wallstreet: A Black Holocaust in America!, the authors have chronicled for the very first time in the words of area historians and elderly survivors what really happened there on that fateful summer day in 1921 and why it happened. Wallace similarly explained to me why this bloody event from the turn of the century seems to have had a recurring effect that is being felt in predominately Black neighborhoods even to this day.

 

Black Wall Street Part 3

Black Wall Street The Black Holocaust The Untold Story!

Searching under the heading of “riots,” “Oklahoma” and “Tulsa” in current editions of the World Book Encyclopedia, there is conspicuously no mention whatsoever of the Tulsa race riot of 1921, and this omission is by no means a surprise, or a rare case. The fact is, one would also be hard-pressed to find documentation of the incident, let alone and accurate accounting of it, in any other “scholarly” reference or American history book.

That’s precisely the point that noted author, publisher and orator Ron Wallace, a Tulsa native, sought to make nearly five years ago when he began researching this riot, one of the worst incidents of violence ever visited upon people of African descent. Ultimately joined on the project by colleague Jay Wilson of Los Angeles, the duo found and compiled indisputable evidence of what they now describe as “a Black holocaust in America.

 Black Wall Street The Black Holocaust The Untold Story!

Helping black people regain their historic  memory…iTubeBlack.com

Black Wall Street Part 2 at iTubeBlack.com

The Truth Finally available about Black Wall Street

Black Wall Street, the name fittingly given to one of the most affluent all-Black communities in America, was bombed from the air and burned to the ground by mobs of envious Whites. In a period spanning fewer than 12 hours, a once thriving Black business district in northern Tulsa lay smoldering – a model community destroyed and a major African-American economic movement resoundingly defused.